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Do You Hear Something?

How do you engage audio learners in your story? Many readers are visual people. They like to see things, and thus enjoy reading. (Which, by the way, I am a visual!) Audio people enjoy books on tape, music, and all things connected to the ears!

In order to draw your reader into the world you created on the written page, it is most imperative you entice them with their senses. Engagement of your readers happens with sound words. This is otherwise none as onomatopoeia: words that sound like are written. Please include words with flavor, resonance, texture, aromas, and pictures in the mind. Your readers will come back again and again when they know they can step into your world and feel as though they are actually living in the pages of your book.

Call out to your readers in a way they can relate!

Here is a wonderful list of sound words for inspiration:

clink, clang, clatter
boom, burst, explode
crunch, crackle, crinkle
gurgle, garbled, groan
murmur, cooed, whispered
plunk, splash, dripped
sizzle, splatter, splat
rumble, rick-a-shay, echoed
rattle, bang, creaked
whiz, whee!, whoa
thud, ker-plunk, drizzle
zing, zip, zoomed

Do you struggle with sound words? Or do you have some favorite sound words you'd like to share?

Comments

  1. You amaze me, you write blogs full of helpful hints, work on a query for the haunted writing clinic, and hop around to other blogs giving helpful advice--how?

    Thank you, by the way, for the chocolate last night and the suggestions this morning. But I won't give up -- even though like GUTGAA my genre isn't in the running.

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    1. You make me blush, Yolanda. Thank you for your kind words!

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  2. I agree with Yolanda. Your blog posts are amazing, Ink! They're so helpful and sometimes funny. How do you do it? What is your secret? ;)

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    1. Ah, gee! *kicks foot across the ground while blushing with a sway, sway*

      Thanks Rachel. You're too kind!

      Delete
  3. Good aspect of writing to think about-- not only for the audio-attuned, but to help make descriptions richer and more impactful.

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    1. You're right Julie! Descriptive words just make for better writing:)

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  4. i love, kathunk, kathunk, sound words!!

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    1. I know. Me too! This makes me want to go write. Oh wait. That's what I've been doing all day. I needed a bloggy break, to say thanks to my lovely followers and faithful readers!

      Delete
  5. Great point, I think I do put my readers senses to use but this is something to definitely consider when editing. Thanks.

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    1. Hi Suzanne! Sometimes it's hard for me to remember not everyone is like me. I'm visual, but many are auditory or "feelers" so it's important to include everyone in your writing.

      Wait. Did that even make sense??

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  6. That is a wonderful list! I know I've used a few of those words, but probably not enough. On the other hand, we probably don't want to go overboard!

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    1. It was just a little inspiration. Trying to help out with all the senses in my writing!

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  7. Great post. I find the hardest sense to include is smell. And its one of the most important in my life so I try super hard to get it in my work.

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    1. Awww, the old sniffer! Come back for my next post. I'm talking about the sense of smell:)

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