Friday, October 12, 2012

When I read a book with riveting characters and the sequel finally hits the market, reading book two often feels like I am meeting a group of old friends again after a long interlude.


People want to read about characters and many readers fall in love or hate with the characters inside the pages of a book. I have often read books that lacked a good plot but I finished the book anyway. Why? Because the characters were interesting. I became mentally involved with the characters as if they were real. These characters drew me into the book and I could not stop caring for them. I was not satisfied until I made it to the end of the book and learned how my characters turned out from beginning to end.

Here is a tip I use:


When developing my characters, I write about them like I know them. In other words, I imagine the people in my book have been long time friends, or enemies, and I know them well enough to help my readers know them.

How can you write about a character if you have never met them? It's time for you to meet your characters! Interview them. Talk to them. Ask them questions. Talk to their friends and family. Ask their co-workers and boss questions. Get to know your character so your readers can know them too.

16 comments:

  1. After writing the third book, I think I know Byron rather well. And I'm glad I'm not him!

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    1. Yea, some characters sure have a ton of bricks to fight their way out off of them:) Why are we so mean to the ones we love the most???? hehe

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  2. I've written my character's biographies before, even if I don't use the information for the book. I've also pretended to interview them, just so I could hear their answers in my head. Now, this either means I'm developing a relationship with. my characters or have serious undiagnosed issues.;)

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    1. Ha! which is worse? A relationship with a character in your book or undiagnosed issues?????

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  3. You've written some good tips on getting to know your characters. Sometimes its quite hard to define whether your hearing their voice or yours, because after all you're making them up! But I enjoy the process:)
    p.s the pitch workshop sounds good, Ill have to get more organised and attend one:)

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    1. It's a fine line between the author and the character, isn't it?
      Thanks!!

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  4. Wonderful post, I know them from birth to death, of course quite a few die rather early. :)

    I was once criticized for including personal information about the victims. But I think it's important for the reader to connect even with those leaving on the same page. But, maybe that's just me.

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    1. I love a personal connection with a character. No connection, no read:)

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  5. I love using the interview technique. I find it works remarkably well for getting to hear the character rather than the author speak. Whenever I interview a character, they always surprise me with some insight that I didn't know before.

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    1. Me too. And it's usually good surprises. But not always.

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  6. Thanks for the inspiring post!

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  7. Thank you, Jess! I'm glad you thought so:)

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  8. Great post! I love meeting old "friends" when a sequel comes out. It's so much fun to spend time with them again!

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  9. This is exactly how I feel about Charlain Harris' Sookie Stackhouse books. I've read them all, even though there's like 12 books out.

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  10. I just tagged you in the Next Big Thing meme on my blog. I hope you are up for it. If you would like a list of the questions, shoot me an email. Shell :)

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