Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Tuesday's Tinted Ink: Worldbuilding Blog Fest

I Know. I'm late. This is one of my charms...okay, biggest pains...I'm a late bloomer:)

(Beside being Queen of the typos)

But World building is a huge part of EVERY story. Not just Sci-Fi or Fantasy. Even if your story takes place somewhere like, say, New York City. I've never been there. *shakes head and sighs* I know, right?

So if I have never been to the world of your story, you better do a good job of helping me experience my vacation to your world.

For the blog fest I am taking part of, here at Sharon Bayliss's blog, the first entry is all about the geography. Describe it, use a picture, talk about the weather, or other ideas to help the reader get a feel for the world you are writing about in your manuscript. I opted to use some pictures I found on Flickr Creative Commons. Thank you, by the way, to all the wonderful photographers who put their work out there for us to use.

Flickr link
This photo shows what my world looks like to an outsider, gazing up to my spectacular MC's city. It's beautiful, isn't it?

Flickr link
This photo is what it looks like when my MC travels to the world of the 2nd MC. Looks scary, I know. But really, it's not. You can see she has made contact and the trip was successful. (she's the white spot...)

And last,
Flickr link

This is the world my 2nd MC lives. This is the favorite meeting spot of everyone in town. They call it the wishing well, but there's really no well. It's a decorative fountain.

Two different worlds. What conclusions did you draw about my worlds? I'll explain them tomorrow!!! Happy day, beautiful guys and dolls!






11 comments:

  1. Yay! You're on the hop too! Two worlds, looks interesting! :-D

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  2. I've never been to New York either. Whenever a novel is set anywhere, even my hometown, I want the author to describe it, even if I can laugh and say it's wrong. Not that I would, nor that anyone would set a novel in Stevenage.

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  3. Very cool!

    I've never been to New York either. :( Though I'm changing that this summer! :)

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  4. I love world building! It's become one of my favorite things to do as an author. One thing I learned last year is that no matter how many pictures we look at and no matter how many maps, weather charts, vaction blogs, and newspapers we consult, it is so easy to get some detail wrong when describing a real place unless you've actually been there.

    I was lucky enough to spend over a week in the city my novel's set in. Unfortunately, we can't always afford to visit the places we want to. For situations like that, I don't get too detailed about the setting, but do you have any tips for those who want to do outstanding worldbuilding of a real place and aren't able to travel?

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    1. What I do: I watch movies and videos, visit restaurants that serve the type of food they eat, I make trips to stores and TRY ON clothing (if I can. I laugh thrift stores for this very purpose.) I do things they would do, and most of all, I READ about the place. I cruise website with great pictures and photos.

      What about you all? Any one else have tips of suggestions for Lanette?

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    2. Another trick, for those who are interested, is to buy a phrasebook (assuming it's a non-English speaking country). Even though it's purpose is to learn enough words and phrases to visit the country, it gives cultural tips and commonly used phrases and what never to say.

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  5. Does your character live in a city with an artificial sun? Guess I'll have to come by tomorrow to find out.

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  6. Beautiful photos, even if I can't make sense of the 2nd.

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  7. That is interesting. I have to wonder about the culture shock when the 1st MC goes to the second world and has to move around.

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  8. Ooo, very intriguing! Thanks for participating!

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