Wednesday, May 22, 2013

WIP'd Ink Wednesday

Hey guys! I know, I've been gone this week. So sorry guys:(

I've been so busy, I can't keep up with how busy I am! I've got a very busy summer and it's all a good busy, so I'm not complaining!

For today's post, I'm going to leave you a few tips for your WIP. These tips all come from literary agents that I've collected the past few weeks.

1. Does your book begin with some sort of "false" scene? Such as a dream. Or maybe you have this awesome character the reader falls in love with and by they end of the first chapter, he dies. These types of scenes should be avoided.

2. Too much description of the world building or setting. I've learned this the hard way! Description is nice and it's needed to bring a reader the world of your story, But too much is boring and it's an over kill of unnecessary details that will either make the reader skim, or stop reading.

3. This one is controversial, but I'm sticking it in my list of things to avoid because I happen to agree with this piece of advice. NO PROLOGUES!  I know, I know. You may feel the prologue is absolutely vital. If it really, REALLY is important to include a prologue, it may still be better to try and include the backstory in small, creative ways int he story and forget the prologue.


So, beautiful guys and dolls. What about you? Do you agree with my advice? have any thing to include?

8 comments:

  1. Good advice. I love to read the rules and then keep in mind that you have to, ultimately, follow your heart.

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    1. That's why I love art. There are rules to follow and the artist's heart to guide you!

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  2. Never started with a false scene and I am sparse on my descriptions.
    Ironically, my publisher asked for a prologue for my first book. The next two I managed without one though.

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    1. Obviously, your publisher had a very good reason to ask for a prologue, so kudos for great publishers!

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  3. I changed my mind on prologues after meeting with agents, too.

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    1. Like I said, if a prologue is absolutely necessary, then start with one. Many are not needed though, so it's a tough call for the author.

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  4. I took the prologue out of my first book, but left it in the second. I just had to, besides, it's only a short one, that shouldn't count- should it? LOL.

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    1. so the prologue was kinda like a 'prequel"?

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